We bustle to the Hustle

Leave a comment

Hot Dog Hustle, 252 Ballarat Road, Braybrook.

Well golly and gosh – haven’t we been very good boys!

CTS HQ has been awash with vegetables, salads, legumes, unmeaty pasta dishes and all manner of righteous eating for what seems like weeks.

Now I reckon it’s time to go a bit crazy.

I say to Bennie: “C’mon buddy – we’re going!”

Says he: “Where???”

“It’s a surprise – one you’ll like!”

Hot Dog Hustle, a Braybrook-based food truck operation, has been on our list for yonks – it’ll be a pleasure to tick this one off our to-do list.

It’s a dim and drizzle early evening, so we are happy to find some rudimentary – and covered – seating is available for our dining pleasure.

Bennie orders the “Furi” ($12) and its teriyaki sauce, caramelised onion, jalapeno, spicy mayo, Hustle mayo, chilli flakes, furikake and shichimi peppers.

Two mouthfuls into his meal and the Bennie verdict is in.

It’s supremely unequivocal.

“This is truly great,” he enthuses.

But he is a little envious of my bulgogi cheesesteak ($15) and its sliced steak, caramalised onion, grilled capsicum, melted cheese and Hustle mayo.

And so he should be.

This is magnificent!

It’s an awesome fast-food feast packed with a variety of intense flavours.

The sliced beef is tender, easily devoured and tasty.

A “free” fried egg is included with each of hot dogs and the fries and onion rings ($5 each) are good accompaniments, though the latter constitute a rather small serving.

The hot dogs themselves are far from the top-notch smoked kind we have at home, bought from Andrew’s Of Yarraville, but they’re quite adequate for the food here.

Seeing the Hod Dog Hustle pics on FB, I had been wondering how customers eat such creations when the toppings outweigh the dogs and buns beneath.

And the buns are the real fluffy hot dog kind – a far cry from the Vietnamese banh mi baguettes we use for hot dogs and kranski at home.

With their hands?

Nah, don’t think so – I reckon they do what we do and go the knife and fork.

Check out the Hot Dog Hustle website here.

Yarraville dumpling zone

2 Comments

 

Chi Bao, 46 Anderson Street, Yarraville.

Greater Asia is as vast as Yarraville’s village is tiny.

Nevertheless, in our 15+ Yarraville years, we have tried a goodly number of local eateries of one Asian persuasion or another.

Sometime it’s been great.

More often it’s been just OK.

And sometimes it’s been dreadful.

Yet heading to Chi Bao – the village’s spanking new dumpling emporium – we are cheerful, optimistic.

But nor are we weighted down with high expectations.

We figure we’ll be doing fine if we get something of similar standard to what we might be served at Highpoint or Pacific Werribee.

 

 

So we are consequently ecstatic, thrilled and quite happy about the quality and deliciousness of our lunch.

The menu does play it a little safe in places – after all this is not central Footscray, Sunshine or St Albans, where hardcore can be a viable business plan.

So the Chi Bao menu has, of course, fried rice, but also Shanghai fried noodles, spring rolls and even sweet and sour pork.

But in the food we enjoy there is not slightest sense of gentrificated compromise, even if the pricing appears to be a tad higher than we’d pay for similar food in Footscray.

And we appreciate that our chosen dishes do not all arrive in a flurry – the wait times denote the care evident in our food.

 

 

Up first is the simplest of salads ($7.80) – cucumber with the lightest of applications of a vinegar sesame dressing.

It’s cool and just right.

 

 

Salt and pepper tofu ($6.80) appears, at first blush, to be rather pale and unappealing.

But in the eating it is superb, the tofu pieces delicately rendered and imbued with a spot-on level of salt.

 

 

The chilli dumplings ($16.80) are 10 steamed pork-and-cabbage parcels luxuriating in house-made chilli oil.

The dumplings are every bit as good as we could wish for.

But what really excites us about this dish is the funky, rich, sticky and spicy chilli oil.

It’s not in the danger zone, but is very much an improvement on the weak, pallid, watery versions we have been served elsewhere.

 

 

Our beef and celery pan-fried dumplings ($15.80 for 12) arrive freshly turned out of the pan and sporting a lacy bottom.

These, too, are superb – though we detect little or no difference in flavour attributable to the presence of celery over cabbage.

The dumplings at Chi Bao are colour-coded to make identification by the staff easier when it comes tom look-a-like dishes.

So the chicken dumplings, for instance, have some turmeric included.

In the case of our beef-and-celery dumplings, the grey-with-black-dots colour scheme is thanks to black sesame.

Chi Bao is a hit.

It is happily occupying a niche in Yarraville that obviously needed filling.

 

VenU – a study in good eating

Leave a comment

 

VenU, Level 1 Building D, corner of Nicholson and Buckley Streets, Footscray (enter restaurant via Albert Street). Phone: 9919 8708

Tertiary education and other training and teaching institutions – and their people – have become ever more entwined in western suburbs life.

And, of course, some of this training and education involves courses and (mostly) young people looking to pursue careers in the hospitality industry.

They include those taking part in the Victoria University Polytechnic’s VenU restaurant for the next month or so – until early December.

The students man every part of this enterprise from the kitchen through to front of house.

 

 

After enjoying lunch there as a guest (full disclosure below), the CTS verdict is in.

It’s really, really good!

It’s super affordable!

It’s licensed!

You should go!

There are representative menus below.

Lunch and afternoon tea are available on Tuesdays.

Lunch and (early) dinner on Wednesdays.

For more details phone, 9919 8708; online bookings can be made here.

For lunch, I am joined by Megan and Denise from the VU marketing department and we have a very nice time.

 

 

The first surprise comes in the dining room.

Instead of the canteen-like vibe I am expecting, VenU is a real-deal restaurant with snappy, on-the-ball staff (students) and even linen napkins.

The food?

We have everything offered in the lighter fare found on the day’s lunch menu – and it’s all lovely.

 

 

Owing to countless unfortunate incidents in my childhood, pumpkin is pretty much my least favourite vegetable.

But the VenU pumpkin soup with cooconut ($5) wins me over – completely – with ease.

 

 

My housemade potato gnocchi with a “cream reduction” ($12) look like they’re they’re going to be oh-so-stodgy.

They’re far from it – they’re light, fluffy and delicious.

Though I do consume only as much of the rich sauce as is necessary to enjoy the pasta pillows.

 

 

My companions enjoy their seared pork belly with pickled vegetables ($12) and …

 

 

… roasted onion and goat cheese tart with red pepper relish and greens ($12) every bit as much.

The apple strudal with vanilla cream ($4, top photo) is a cracking dessert dream.

The cafe latte I have with it is excellent.

(Consider The Sauce dined at VenU as guests of the management and we did not pay for our meals. We were free to order whatever we wished. VenU management neither sought nor was granted any input, oversight or pre-publication access to his story.)

 

Snag mission

2 Comments

 

A&L Gugliotta and Sons Butchers, 314 Blackshaws Road, Altona North. Phone: 9391 1606

After noting the front-of-house upgrade at Gugliotta and Sons in the most recent edition of Westie eats goss, I have been invited back to observe the making of sausages.

The old joke goes that after watching sausages being made, you’ll never want to eat one again.

In this instance, that is definitely not the case.

I am impressed by the simplicity of the process and the freshness of the ingredients.

The odours are likewise fresh and clean – if odours can be clean!

I love watching Nick and his offsider, Anthony, at work as their colleagues hussle about us taking care of other meaty chores.

 

 

The business makes quite a big range of sausages, but the main task today is a big batch of your basic Italian-style pork snags.

They start with two tubs of cut-up pork, one leaner and …

 

 

… one that includes a good deal more back fat.

As Nick says, a sausage without fat is a tasteless sausage.

 

 

The two tubs of meat are put through the mincer.

This is one of three machines used in the sausage-making process.

The machines are all simple affairs and, really, provide quite close facsimiles for what would take place if the whole process was done by hand.

 

 

To blend and bind, the meat is then put in the mixer.

At this stage, salt, pepper, some wine and a little water are added.

That’s it – that’s your basic pork sausage!

 

 

Given the homespun approach taken here, you’ll be unsurprised to learn Gugliotta and Sons use natural casings.

 

 

They are delivered to the Blackshaws Road shop packed in salt.

So while the meat is being prepared, the casings are being rinsed in lemon-infused water to remove the saltiness.

 

 

The minced-and-mixed meat is placed in an air pump and the meat forced into the casings.

The comes the most magic part – and the most manual!

With flashing dexterity, Nick ties off the long tube of sausage into near-equal lengths.

Here it is the thinner pork sausages that are being created.

Nick looks for all the world like a grandad making balloon animals for the grandkids.

 

 

Also being made today is a smaller batch of Sicilian sausages.

 

 

The provlone, chopped fresh and canned tomatoes and endive are mixed into the same meat base.

 

 

Anthony tells me it took a while for him to fully get the knack of the tying off process, but that these days he could pretty much do it in his sleep.

 

 

Here’s Nick with a water pump/sausage filler of the kind used in an earlier era.

Thanks for inviting me, guys!

 

A village vibe for Brooklyn

6 Comments

 

The Brooklyn neighbourhood bordered by Cypress Avenue, Princes Highway and Millers Road is a sweet residential backwater.

But it deserves and needs its own cafe.

And now it’s getting just that.

We’ve long admired the row of old-school shops on Eames Road, just of Millers Road.

In the past year or so, we’ve usually checked them out when parking prior to eating at Parotta Station, which is just around the corner on Millers. (NB: The prices have gone up a bit since that story was published!)

 

 

Dennis Ngo is busy setting up his Eames Avenue cafe, to be known as Chapter One Brooklyn.

“The food I’ll be serving will be toasties, baguettes, pastries and cakes – so simple and quick for those on the go,” he says. 

“I’m hoping this place will bring the residents of Brooklyn out and know that there is somewhere they can meet while out walking their dogs or even out  bike riding. 

“I’ve been on the industry for over 10 years now and worked for many cafes. Customers have told me that there is no good coffee shops in the area so I would really love to put Brooklyn on map and make it a great place to go. 

“As well help out the other businesses next to me and work along side each other.”

 

 

The cafe will be located in what was once the home a family day care establishment.

 

 

And those other businesses?

Well, one of them is a barber – and not just any barber either.

Famous hair cutter Doug Howie is here after being a long-standing institution on Williamstown Road and, more recently and briefly, on Francis Street.

 

 

Doug has, of course, brought with him to Brooklyn his magical collection of, well, stuff – and there’s plenty of room for it in his new digs.

Doug gives me a $25 hot-towel shave while I’m there.

 

Westie eats goss 17/10/19

11 Comments

 

A&L Gugliotta and Sons Butchers has been operating at 314 Blackshaws Road, Altona, for 50 years.

Nick Gigliotta (on the right) has been working there for as long.

These days he does his meaty magic there with brother Nick and six other staff.

This is a proudly old-school butcher shop where everything is done on the premises.

 

 

The place has just unveiled a whole new look and upgrade, better enabling the team to showcase such delights as the range of sausages, the quality of which is familiar to CTS.

 

 

There’s room, too, for a nice line in high-class pasta and sauces.

 

 

Just around the corner and a few blocks away is what used to be Altona Fresh.

The wonderful shop has a new name – Second Ave Grocer.

 

 

I figured the name change was probably down to trying to make the place’s renown part of the greater western suburbs, rather than just Altona.

But smiling Phil tells me that’s not the case.

He says with a laugh that the only people who called it Altona Fresh were those visiting from the other side of the river.

“All our other customers just say, when they’re on their phones in here, ‘We’re at Second Ave’,” he says. “So when we were upgrading our systems, we thought it was the obvious thing to do!”

Since first writing about this food emporium, it has become a weekly regular for the CTS household, including brunch last weekend for the regular Saturday kranski barbecue outside.

 

 

The Mid-East food presence in the western suburbs has received another lovely lift with the arrival of Oscar’s Teta in Spotswood.

Located at 143 Hudsons Road, just of Williamstown Road, Oscar’s Teta boasts a wonderfully welcoming dining room.

 

 

The menu is pretty much straightahead Lebanese – which is a fine thing, we reckon.

 

 

CTS is very much looking forward to taking the Oscar’s Teta food for a spin.

 

 

Opening this Sunday, October 20, is Le Petit Cafe Rose at 229 Somerville Road, Yarraville.

 

 

Taking over the premises formerly occupied by Happy Maree, the place will be doing a nice line in cakes, muffins, sandwiches, croissants and the like.

 

 

Now operating at 67 Berkshire Road in Sunshine North is burger joint Coal Workshop.

It’s in the shop once home to Latin Foods & Wines.

The burger, onion rings and fries CTS tried were good, solid efforts.

Cafe high point

3 Comments

 

Rustica, Highpoint.

The existence of a branch of famous Fitzroy cafe/bakery Rustica at Highpoint came as a complete surprise to us.

But, asked to meet friends there, we are eager to try.

Highpoint Rustica is located well away from all the other centre’s food outlets and courts, in the newer, swisher part of the centre.

It’s easy to forget it’s in a shopping centre – and that’s a fine and no doubt deliberate thing.

There’s indoor and outdoor seating – well, sort-of outdoor!

The staff do an admirable job and the pricing is thereabouts in comparison with other western suburbs cafes presenting food of similar quality and sophistication.

 

 

The not so good first.

My slow-roasted garlic and rosemary lamb baguette ($19) looks the part with its greens, pomegranate, pickled onion and garlic labneh.

But it is dull, lacking the zing the ingredients so strongly suggest.

The best bit is the side serve of potato salad.

 

 

In some ways, the menu disturbs with its long-winded and extravagant lists of ingredients for many dishes.

The dish called Smashed Peas ($20), for instance, stacks up thusly: Beetroot cured salmon, snow pea tendrils, radish, zucchini noodles, puffed wild rice, goats whip, beetroot hummus and poached egg on quinoa-soy-linseed toast.

Tendrils?

Ha!

But this is a winner and I love every mouthful, wiping the plate clean.

To my cynicism-fuelled surprise, ALL the ingredients/flavours fit just right.

The egg is superbly done.

The fish is mild of flavour but very good.

The greens and salad bits are of prime freshness.

I’d order this again without hesitation.

 

 

The Spiced Chickpea Falafels ($19.50) are equally fine.

The good falafels are fat and a little dry.

But that’s no problem at all when they’re keeping company with roasted zaatar carrots and cauliflower, pickled red cabbage, pomegranate, more of the beetroot hummus stuff and grilled ciabatta with zaatar seasoning.

It’s a colourful jumble of joy, full of crunch and taste tingles.

The coffee here is excellent.

And I’m told by one who knows that the likes of their almond croissants and cronuts are to live for.